Clean Water, Stewardship and Environmental Education Interns Join Watershed

Seven interns have joined The Watershed Institute as interns this summer and will be working on projects ranging from water quality monitoring to environmental education to stewardship of the 950-acre Watershed Reserve.

Two of the interns will focus mostly on water monitoring on the Delaware River tributaries, including Jacobs Creek, Assunpink Creek and Shabakunk Creek.

 

Maggie Emley, 21, a rising junior at Green Mountain College in Vermont, is joining the intern team as an Alliance for Watershed Education (AWE) Fellow. Her focus will be on the Delaware River watershed and also helping to strengthen relations with the Watershed’s partners in Trenton and Ewing.

 

Hanna Rush, 20, one of the members of the inaugural class of the Watershed Academy in 2015, is a rising senior at the University of Washington. She will work closely with Maggie on water quality monitoring on the Delaware River tributaries.

Three interns will gain experience in land stewardship, green infrastructure and forest restoration.

 

Oona DiMatteo, 18, an incoming freshman at Tulane University, is the Watershed’s Green Infrastructure and Native Plants intern. She will help maintaining existing rain gardens, memorial gardens, green roof, driveway beautification and the spur path to the Lawrence Hopewell Trail at the Watershed Center. She will also help update our raingarden manuals required for the Watershed’s River-Friendly Business Certification.

 

Josh Drossman, 19, a class member of Princeton University ’22, is an intern through the Princeton Environmental Institute. He’ll be working on several stewardship projects including the deer exclosure and a forest restoration study.

 

Maeve Kessler, 20, a rising sophomore at the University of Maryland, is the Ted Stiles Environmental Stewardship intern and will be helping with the native tree nursery, removal of invasive plants, planting trees along Wargo Pond and working on other stewardship projects.

Environmental science education interns Sarah Crosby and Amanda Ellen came aboard in January. They will be on campus until late fall for their longer internships.

 

Jeff Hoagland, Education Director, said both interns bring great enthusiasm, dedication, and experience. For over twenty-five years, he said, these competitive annual internships have provided greater capacity and fresh viewpoints to the Watershed’s education programs. Additionally, the professional training, mentorship, and experience they gain will aid their future paths in the environmental education field.

 

We trust these interns will have a fun, productive and educational summer at the Watershed as they develop their interests and professional skills.